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IS IMRAN KHAN THE REVOLUTION WE ARE LOOKING FOR?

 

 

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Basically revolution is not an easy thing to bring, it requires serious hard work. We have to work hard day and night to bring a revolution. It’s not a one night game. It requires sacrif

ices and time. It cannot be brought in a day or two, takes a lot of time and effort. As very rightly said by CHE GUVERA that “The revolution is not an apple that falls when it is ripe, you have to make it fall.”

Nowadays revolution is just a matter of speech as you can see the upcoming superstar Imran Khan has the only slogan or hoping symbol to make his next election successful.

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Imran khan niazi born on 25th November 1952 is a Pakistani politician and former cricketer playing international cricket for two decades in the late 20th century

In fact, he was not taken seriously for the next 15 years of his political career. He was hardly ever scandalized due to corruption scams like other politicians were; but that was mostly because he was hardly ever noticed. Throughout his career, he has spent most of his time doing two things: criticizing other politicians and struggling to gain real political popularity. He has always been called the ‘cricketer’ turned politician – until October 30, 2010, when he created some significant seismic waves amidst the sea of people in Pakistan.

 

In 2002, he won his first seat in Mianwali. Later, he was offered a slot in another party but he declined and went on boycotting elections. If there is anything constant in his rather rocky career, then that would be (a) his TV appearances bashing other politicians – many of whom have now joined his party, Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI); and (b) his stance on the need for ‘change’.

There are many celebrities in the PTI list as PTI is famous for welcoming discredited politicians from other parties. There is a rising ‘join the-PTI’ craze among the ‘Lotas’ as they say on twitter. Imran says, “They say funny things on twitter.” (Lota is a toilet utensil and symbol of PML-Q.)

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It’s a wonder how Imran Khan’s aggressive insistence that he can ‘change’ Pakistan makes this things apparent, which could be true. That he is desperate to come to power – his critics say this ‘greed’ could indeed be backed by the establishment.

 

Manifest in both his greatest triumphs and his most an obvious failure is Imran Khan’s greatest quality. Imran Khan is a born leader, and believes that the steely determination of a leader can single-handedly lead to victory. It is why his World Cup winning speech sounded like that of a singles’ tennis players. At the twilight of “my” career? Imran Khan wasn’t being stubborn or ungraceful. He was just being “me.

 

There are two lessons that Imran Khan could have learnt from his cricketing and philanthropic adventures. The first is that people matter, and therefore, change can only come about when the people stand up and make it happen. The second is that no matter how good a leader, a winning team is made up of multiple points of talent and skill. Only teams can win team sports.

On most days, it is obvious that Imran Khan learnt the first lesson well, but did not learn the second, at all. The PTI is a collection of nice young people, from mostly good families, who are almost exclusively from the cities. That is a demographic that has had almost zero electoral success. The reason is quite simple. They don’t vote. But even if they were to start voting, what are the chances that Imran Khan’s peripheral populism would catch fire and become a national juggernaut? Pretty low.

Some, for sure. But not all. Imran Khan’s political failures are the topic of many a cocktail party in Defence, F-6 and over drinks during hunting trips in the deep south of Punjab, and the deeper rural neverland of Sindh. But such criticism, while often on-the-mark, does stretch the imagination. Imran Khan, after all, poses no threat whatsoever to the established political order. Or does he?

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